Handwriting

1380 AD.

 

JOHN WYCLIFFE

John Wycliffe, known as "raising star of reformation", spent most of his life at the University of Oxford ­ first as a student, then as a professor. He devoted himself solely to the teaching of the Bible, which resulted in the birth of a movement called Lollardism, in which its members were travelling across England teaching Biblical truths ­ the most important being the value of the Word of God.

TRANSLATION FROM LATIN TO ENGLISH

Around 1378 Wycliffe published his work called "de veritate sacrae scripturae", in which he explained that all Gods children are equal and have the same ability to understand the Bible. He proclaimed that, "The Holy Scripture is the ultimate authority for every Christian, the rule of faith and the way of personal improvement". The result of his love for the Word of God was an English translation of the Bible from Latin, based on Vulgate. John Wycliffe died in 1384, leaving a hope for a time, when everyone would be able to read the Bible in their national language. His Bible helped in the preparations for the way to reformation. In response to the widespread interest in this ranslation, the Roman Catholic Church condemned Wycliffe on the Council of Constance as a heretic and ordered exhumation and the ashes were thrown into the Swift River.

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