Handwriting

930 AD.

 

CODEX FROM ALEPPO

Sacred texts of the Old Testament were passed through in the form of handwritten scrolls, made of animal skin. The language was either Hebrew or Aramaic. A scribe wrote the text from right to left, without vowels, punctuations or accents. This was the form in which God's Word was passed to the next generations.

SACRED TEXTS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT

Around 500 AD a group of people called the Masoretes, began the process of copying writings and adding some elements, allowing the text to be read in the correct way. The Masoretes came up with a system ­ or tradition ­ of marking vowels. Thanks to their system, we received help in reading, reciting and coping the writings. Additional symbols in the form of dots and marks above and below the letters indicated to the reader what accent should be used. This type of work took place in two places: first in Babylonia, and second in Tiberias.

ORIGIN OF THE ALEPPO CODEX

The creation of the was the work of Ben Asher's family, the biggest of Tiberias Masoretes families. This document was written in approx. 930 AD on parchment sheets, bound in one book. The name of the codex comes from the town of Aleppo in Syria, where the codex was guarded in a synagogue until 1947. This document is the oldest known, complet copy of what we call a Masoretic text. Scribes created rules of copying the text that were characterized by incredible diligence ­ each word and each character had to be counted, no letter could be omitted or added. In this way content of extraordinary history survived to our times, written down in a book of timeless importance. In the Holy Land it was called the Crown of Israel.

INSTEAD OF BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Archeologia Biblijna,